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Wednesday, December 06, 2006

cruel

I used to work at this place for genius kids ... no, really - bunch of little fukking geniuses. They were 8 and 12 year-olds schooling me in chemistry, Latin, 3-D graphic programming.

These kids were unbelievably smart. Brains so fast, so encompassing that I had to run 180-octane to come close to keeping them challenged and interested.


I was not very good at my job.


Anyway ... these kids had the capacity to sit and gobble up chapter after chapter of the densest of publishings, for hours on end. They would chew-on and choke-hold an equation until the sun rose. They would write, they would design, they would build, test, dream.

it was amazing.

they were kids with such capacity, such energy, such talented minds in these scrawny-odd underdeveloped bodies. They were wild, constrained, untested and naively wise souls. They were ...

isolated.


Could they play with their age-peers? No. The fun shared ran out too soon.

Could they hang with their intellectual peers? No.
12 year-olds and college students don't do well together for prolonged periods of time.


And so ... when we created a community for them to share their experiences, share their similarities ~ they went nutz with it.

- - -

Cyclists

I very much believe that the idea of an athletic demi-god, one who hardly has to train to excel at the sport, is ... a myth. I believe that those who advance in sport, those who become champions ~ they have to work hard for it. They have to suffer for it, must sacrifice, force themselves under such a weight of dedication that it would crush the vast majority of us.

This i believe.


And this too, i believe, brings about isolation.


thus, the community.

14 comments:

velogirl said...

even for mere mortals like us, this sport seems to isolate us a bit. i used to have lots of friends who did lots of different things (most involving alcohol, but whatever). training 20 hours a week, going to bed early, travelling and racing on the weekends seemed to interfere with those friendships. i'd turn down invitations to parties, social events, dinners. and once you do that too many times, the invitations eventually stop coming.

VeloRainDog said...

if i had a dollar for every time i said, "sorry, guys. i'd love to, but i gotta go ride."

Anonymous said...

Ya, It's not doing wonders for my single statius, but you gotta have priorites and mine are flying down the road at 100 rpm and being able to really enjoy it. Girls come, girls go, she's out there somewhere, on the road, in the dirt, climbing mountians, closing business deals, on the internet, at the grocery store etc....

Somewhere.......

yellowbug said...

My response to your post is "Of course". I was once a high school state champion in cross country . . . I was probably less talented than many other's I was racing, but I dedicated absolutely 110% of myself to the feat. Eating, sleeping, breathing, my goal.

It was a horrible and cruel goal to set for myself. Although I accomplished it, the sacrifices and complete isolation - the loneliness I enforced on myself - made me absolutely miserable. I somehow believed that I had to be suffering at all times to actually be dedicated to my sport. I slept in an unheated room in Oregon winters, insisted on hunger at all times, and refused to train less than 20 hrs a week as a high school student. I have never been able to push myself quite the same after that experience.

velogirl said...

Nick, you gotta come on our singles rides!!!

Anonymous said...

What, are you trying to say that there's something weird about me being up at 5:00 a.m. so I can get on the rollers for an hour and a half before work? Yeah, well, uh, you drive a minivan there dude.

Benjaminiac said...

every once in a while you need to pull back from the driving pace and evaluate. is it all worth it? am i getting enough out of it to justify the sacrifice?

i do.

Anonymous said...

If I could briefly interject.
You guys are all messed up! I have never had more social interaction than I do right now. I have more friends and people I really enjoy in my life than any other time I can remember.

Maybe you guys are doing something wrong. I have list of 53 people that are my closest friends. Then I have all of you guys for what I consider my second closest friends. (slap on a red and black spidey kit and you can make the A list)

Cycling has provided social experiences that I never would have had without it. Being friends with so many from such an eclectic group of people has enriched my life in so many ways. From personal growth to shifts in my investing and financial perspective.
Not to mention what I have learned about growing an organization and managing a company/non-profit organization.
Yeah, some might think it's just a silly little bike team, but we run it it like a marketing firm and we have 53 employees.

X Bunny said...

this is like the 93rd different job i've heard you've had

Brennabella said...

"I very much believe that the idea of an athletic demi-god, one who hardly has to train to excel at the sport, is ... a myth. I believe that those who advance in sport, those who become champions ~ they have to work hard for it. They have to suffer for it, must sacrifice, force themselves under such a weight of dedication that it would crush the vast majority of us."

Okay, but you have to admit that there are some athletes out there who are extremely gifted. VO2Max better than most, ran cross country since they were 6 years old, got scholarships to Ivy Leagues... then got on the bike and excelled...
and along the way earned a PhD... They suffered, sacrificed, trained hard--harder than most, turned Pro, went to the Olympics, then to Worlds and got on the Podium...
This is slightly demi-godish, eh?
Then there are some who are kinda above average. No matter how hard they train, will not usually beat the PhD demigod, just cause the VO2max thing... and the red wine and the cookies... but occasionally, the above average can suck the demi-gods wheel, and get pretty darn close to the finish line at the same time... and have one hell of a time doing so...

Cycling is not the sport I am best at. But it is so much harder-- the others came more easily, I was more gifted... I hypothesize that because I have to work harder to be any good, it doesn't come easily, I have sustained interest in it for most my adult life...

I know this doesn't have much to do with being a little genius... or your point about the cycling community...

but it got me thinkin' and aint that what bloggins about?

Olaf Vanderhoot said...

absolutely.


... and you broke about 7 junkadonk comment rules.


show off.

Brent Chapman said...

I actually like the loneliness for the most part.. kinda purifying when your hours away from town at an unforsaken hour and a car drives by and everyone looks at you like your a space alien.

Then i hurt my back. pooh. I need more of those rides to bring me back off the earth and to loose some damn weight.
Flamingo time.

jAndy donka-donk said...

She only broke the rules because she quoted half the original post......

And this was a great post there Mikey......

Being a person with very little natural talent, but have always had an abnormally thick skull. Its nice to be in a sport where the natural still has to work to win......

Anonymous said...

I like pain...